Monday, 30 September 2013

Burnt Hills





The idea for this wall hanging came a decade ago when I was travelling in Northern Spain.
A large area of land had been severely scorched by fire the previous year.The explanation given by
a local man was that the fire had been started by a "tourist". Apparently the first
plants to reappear the next Spring were wild asparagus.



Burnt hills, taken from the bus  -  Catalonia.





The artwork is painted and stitched on linen, measuring about 1.5 meters square.
As often happens the work was not begun for a few years and still needs some finishing touches.




Detail



















Moorland, near Loch Tay.

In Scotland controlled heather burning is carried out yearly to promote new plant growth.




These blackface sheep are standing on a patch of ground which is regenerating after fire.
Although this is mostly for the benefit of the grouse,which are a valuable source of income for
land owners during the Grouse Shooting Season, the sheep also enjoy the nutritious young plants.
Grouse Shoots are let for large sums of money so it's important to keep the land well stocked.



Image source Wikipedia.

Red grouse in it's native habitat surrounded by young blaeberry and heather plants.
They feed on shoots,seeds,mountain berries and heather flowers.





Heather plants in August.



Thank you for visiting




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                   OUR WORLD TUESDAY

24 comments:

A wondering star said...

Dear friend, this was such a lovely and informative post. I love learning about your country and see your creative art!
The moorland, heather and the animals are all beautifully captured, and I love the color of the heather!

Jorunn Norway

Minoru Saito said...

Hi! Thanks for many information. The artwork is very impressive. Moorland photos are very beautiful.
Thanks for sharing.

rebecca said...

not only am i struck with your beauty i am taken with the way the tiny slashes in the fabric let all the light shine out!
your tapestry of light and love makes all of us dream weavers.
xo

MeOfCourse said...

Wow, that is some very good work. I too love how the slashes bring out the light. The colors are just awesome. Wonderful photos. Thank you.
gloria

Palomasea said...

As always, your work inspires, dear Ruby....
Many blessings,
- Irina

Charlotte said...

The colours of the burnt but regenerating earth are stunning. I admire your patience in the stitching

acreativeharbor.com said...

Fascinating art work and done so well ~ Fantastic nature photography capturing some of nature's gems ~
carol ^_^

Midori said...

Hello I found you from Charlotte's blog. With the avatar, I had to follow it! I almost shouted when I saw the grouse here, because I thought you found it. My dream is to see grouse or caparcaillie in person! Love the gold patches on the fabric! : )

Victoria said...

Hello kindred..what a magnificent post..super beautiful art..and I love the story behind it and in creating it.your tribute is a visual feast! There is such an intensely..yet gentle feel to this art..and also the soul shining through it..mysterious and I love the sensory-textures to it..like a language speaking through! Stunning and beautiful!!
And wow..such lovely scenic beauty..I love heather..so magical! Thanks for all the magic you share!
Victoria

stardust said...

Wildfire is terrible, and it’s more mortifying when its caused by a careless tourist. It’s a relief that nature has its own way of healing and rebirth. The tone of the painting is different from your usual one from its nature, ruby, but I can see new lives lurking and starting to glow. In Japan, controlled grass burning has been conducted to make soil fertile since the time immemorial in the countryside. “Mountain Burning Ceremony” in Nara attracts big tourism as you might have seen in the blogs of some Nara bloggers. I’m simply attracted by the scenery of the Moorland near Loch Tay.

Yoko

Lynn said...

What a gorgeous wall hanging, Ruby! I love the colours and the texture. Those stitches and tears are wonderful.

Your photos of the moorland around Loch Tay make me want to travel to Scotland again one day!

Suman said...

Moors can be so inspiring, and heather patches are ever so beautiful.
Your idea of the wall hanging is truly creative. Thanks for sharing the lovely pictures; Scotland has been a dream since forever.

Suman said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Tammie Lee said...

Such a wonderful piece you were inspired to create after what you saw... the fire. I wonder what the people of that area would think of your cloth.

thank you for sharing all your photos and sharing about your area.

dritanje said...

I really like the colours of your 'after the fire' hanging, their subtleties. Different from the colours you usually use, but then the subject matter is different too. But it is all part of the regeneration, as you say. Mxx

Carola Bartz said...

Your artwork is incredibly beautiful. Those rich earthy colors are stunning and I like the stitching.

Red Rose. said...

Good morning,Ruby!
I am very impressed to see your artistic inspiration from what you saw. Admirable!!
I like the color and the strewn stitches, which represents tiny many rebirth.
The two sheep on the patch are lovely.I also like the photo!
Have a good weekend!
Tomoko

cosmos said...

Yes, in the dark earth hue, many signs of rebirth and lights can be seen. I love that.
Heather looks beautiful!
It's a bit surprising the grouse is a gamebird.We have nationally protected indigenous speices of them.
Have a lovely weekend,Ruby.

sarah said...

The color of your work is impressive and scratching is interesting. That wild asparagus must have tasted. Heath is much more beautiful than I imagine. Because I heard it lives in a barren place.
Have a nice Autumn!

Palomasea said...

Thank you so much for stopping by, dear Ruby!
You have a wonderful October too....
Hugs,
- Irina

retriever said...

Wonderfull landscapes, of your country,love much the color of your work .

A wondering star said...

Thanks so much for taking time to visit and comment on my site - I really appreciate it!

Norway had an estimated population of about 350 individuals. lynx in 2013.

 Lynx live in forested areas throughout the country up to Troms in the north.
I love the beautiful wild animals:)

Karen @ Pieces of Contentment said...

Wonderfully creative work and great photos of amazing countryside.

Bienekatja Buchkleid said...

Great fotos,your landscape and wild life in scotland...and I would like to travel to northern spain,too!I think it`s very breathtaking nature there!Katja

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